[LMB] HH chapter 14

yadler at thejnet.com yadler at thejnet.com
Wed Apr 26 03:38:52 BST 2006


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Elizabeth Holden" <azurite at rogers.com>
To: "Discussion of the works of Lois McMaster Bujold." 
<lois-bujold at lists.herald.co.uk>
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2006 3:34 PM
Subject: [LMB] HH chapter 14


> Chapter 14: In which goes to Boleso's funeral and

a few interesting point before the funeral properly begins:
*Lady Hettwar (no first name?) checks his clothes and approves.  what would 
she make him do if he had spots on his clothes, send him home to change?

*Gesca barely re-acts to i.  does he remember what happended?  does he ever 
have any importance to the plot other than snitch and tale-bearer?

*the 5x5 singers voices' echo in a stone passage, making their voices 
distant and mournful.  does anyone go to a stone church or anything, who 
knows how stone affects voices?  i always assumed echos just blur voices.

w. seems to have clamped down his horse-spirit.  can i. learn to do that 
with his wolf?  w.'s wife fara (NOT fafa, good grief, i through i read fafa 
and what a funeral this will be!  oops.  nope. just fara.)  ahem.  fara 
seems very grief stricken, is it part guilt?

after the funeral animals are uncertain - why on earth does ingrey faint? 
it seems very out of character.  'he fainted bec. that was hte easiest way 
to bring him to /otherwhere/ ' is a very bad reason.  although its 
interesting that his scabbard hits the pavement just as the red colt clops 
forward.  it means his faint doesn't last very long.


the descprition of the red haired man walking in is just beautiful.  did 
anyone mention that yet?
and how many people on the list are suckers for red-heads?

its interesting that ijada's dress has fresh blood on her old dress.  later 
she sees ingrey in his court finery, why isn't she in her current clothes? 
its not as if anyone has forgotten how the prince got dead.

> meets up with a god, the Son, who bids him to free
> Boleso's soul for the afterlife by relieving him of
> his spirit animals; for Ijada's sake, he does it.
>
yes.  ingrey complains that bad people shoudln't go to heaven.  considering 
the company he's keeping, this seems the correct moment to bring it up, but 
how did he have the nerve?

> - Ingrey arguing with the Son, or at least resisting
> his will
>
what a very ingrey thing for him to do! ; )

when ijada says, give him to the river:  she goes on and on - has someone 
been reading lots of poetry lately?  its very nice, but i can't think of 
anyone who would have presence of mind to burble like that in very august 
company.

and when ingrey agrees to stand aside and let the price into heaven, and 
then is told that he'll have to work for it - unlock the gates, so to 
speak - thats just unfair.    and when, after all that work, the prince 
almost doesn't get up on the red colt (how did he get here?) that must have 
been heart stopping.  bu it all turns out well enough.

> - the Son having dappled, luminescent hands - language
> reminiscent of Ijada

quite possibly, she is reminiscent of -his- light.  although from ingrey's 
perspective, you ordered it correctly.

after the funeral - the faint not only gets him to heaven, it gets him out 
of protocol.  how convenient.  it still feels very contrieved.

> I love the description of Ingrey rushing back to
> Ijada, going faster and faster until "he was running,
> his long coat flapping around his boot heels".
>
and running down the stairs two or three at a time.  and running so fast he 
almost threw up after all.  i almost lost my breath just reading it.



when ingrey wants privacy with ijada he tells onlookers 'leave us!' and they 
blow away.  is htat hte weirding voice, or just an angry wolf-lord?


> I wonder about Ingrey's own living quarters.
>
yes, so would i!  i never even thought of him living somewhere permanent.

favorite line, by ijada.  once laughing very hard, and then flip over to 
sweetness:
ingrey:  we did the g's will, now we're discarded to our fate
ijada:    thats very ingrey of you, ingrey. always looking on the dark side.
ingrey:  someone has to be realistic!
ijada:    unterly bleak is not real.  the other colors are real too.


their priorities are interesting.  previously ijada said, get me justice, 
then get on with life.  ingrey said, lets get out of here bec. there -is no 
justice-.  now, ijada says, lets get out of here and pursue higher justice, 
and ingrey sais lets stay here or we'll be too dead for any justice at all.

and then, a mysterious knock at the door!

ziviya 



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