[LMB] SP: TSK: Beguilement Chapter 3

Richard Suitor rsuitor at gmail.com
Wed Dec 6 02:38:49 GMT 2006


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Some comments on points Victoria has discussed.

Why did Dag do what he did (interrupting his pursuit to stash Fawn)?

1.  As others have mentioned, Dag perceived the pregnancy, recognized
it as a prize for the malice, and wanted to do something to get the
prize a bit out of harm's way, both to protect the person and to deny
the prize to the malice.  He recalled a possible place.  It turned out
not to be as suitable as he wished, but, given his priorities, it had
to suffice.

2.  Was there suppressed romantic feelings at this point?  Frankly, at
this point, I would suspect them to be suppressed by the pregnancy.
It's immediate message is TAKEN.  Fawn relieves this message somewhat
with her grass widowhood, but replaces it with NAIVE, not a big
attractor to a pressured 55 yr. old.  He already has the message:
FARMER.

Does this fit into the romantic story development anyway?  Pass.  The
story is as described.  My point is that it is not an unbelievable
distortion of the action plot that is dominant at this stage of the
story.

How exposed is where he left her?

Consider the encounter with the mudman and the turned real man.   The
pair passes her, and the mudman, a little slow on the uptake, or more
likely in extended real time communication with its master, convinces
the real man to turn around and kidnap Fawn.  Unless mudman-malice
interaction is *extremely* slow, that suggests that the mudman doesn't
perceive (or transmit a perception) of the pregnancy until the pair
are very close to Fawn.  Some communication goes on, the pair gets a
priority interrupt, and Fawn is taken.  The carnal exploitation of
Fawn occurred because of subsequent stimulation and opportunity.  The
real man did not immediately respond enthusiastically to the mudman's
interruption.

So there is no reason to suspect that the mudmen have an extended
ground sense.  Does the malice?  Maybe.  The mudmen seemed to show up
at the farm pretty promptly.  Should Dag know about this?  If he does,
he should have no reason to expect the farm to be safe, tenanted or
not.  Unless he thinks the farm is probably outside of the malice's
range.  He certainly knows a pregnant woman is a prize.  I would think
Lakewalkers have extensive data on how far away a malice can detect
such a prize.  The malice has been around for a while, but leaving
evidence that points, heretofore, to a different area.  The farm was
overrun only a short time ago.  Perhaps the malice has been interested
in a different area for mining purposes, and its ground sense just
recently reached out to the farm, which was then harvested.  But Dag
didn't know this, yet.

So, my reaction is that I buy the face value of Dag's juggling
conflicting priorities as best he can.

Richard

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