[LMB] SP: Moms from Heck was: gender and reading, was Legacy bound galleys & breakpoint

Victoria L'Ecuyer vlecuyer at ksu.edu
Mon Dec 11 18:10:07 GMT 2006


Message: 1
Date: Fri, 8 Dec 2006 14:22:14 -0600
 <sraun at fireopal.org>
Subject: Re
	breakpoint
To: "Discussion of the works of Lois McMaster Bujold."
	<lois-bujold at lists.herald.co.uk>
Message-ID: <20061208202214.GA12801 at fireopal.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

On Fri, Dec 08, 2006 at 01:37:10PM -0600, Victoria L'Ecuyer wrote:

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>> Victoria L'Ecuyer wrote:
>> and Dag's (harridan of a [2]) mother will react to that.
>> 
>> [2] Speculation again. Neither Dag nor Mari have kind references for that 
>> woman. 
>  
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From: Scott Raun
>From the few words Mari had to say about Dag's mother, and the fact
that she's been throwing girls at her son for some time - twenty or
thirty years? - I suspect she's going to be more harridan than not.

Victoria, again: 
I'd say fifteen to twenty years myself. Dag was widowed 20 years ago and he moped around his wife's camp for a while before they sent him back to his camp of origin. 

From: Scott Raun
Which brings up a point I'm going to be watching intently. Dag
apparently doesn't really like / approve of Lakewalker camp life. Is
it just his mother, or is it more than that? (I suspect it's more, but
don't have the ambition to dig out the textev right now - when are we
getting an e-book?) If it is more, what is it? And why did Dag come to
disapprove?

Me: 
I don't know if "like / approve" applies to Dag's opinion of camp life. I get the impression he's passively suicidal after loosing his hand and his wife in one fell swoop. To like or dislike and approve or disapprove, you have to care in the first place. If all you want to do is die and your nearest (if not your dearest) is pushing you to live, get re-married, have children and do more that just wallow in your misery, the most expedient way to deal with that is to absent yourself. Dag has a handy excuse in going on patrol and hunting malices. It could also be why Fairbolt Crow allowed/forced Dag to re-habilitate himself and go back on patrol. Can you imagine how difficult it would be to have part of the camp up in arms and fighting each other on a daily basis? 

Mari would be Dag's favorite relative because she's not pushing him to get re-married and have kids. She's letting him wallow in his grief and hunt malices while keeping an eye on his state of mind and body. Three instances come to mind. 1) The opening scene where Fawn is up a tree and Mari reminds Dag, who is already eating that he should be eating, then leaves him to make sure the new patrollers are being sensible, too. 2) When he shows up at the inn with Fawn in tow. Dag: "I'm back, Aunt Mari."  Mari: "Don't you 'Aunt Mari' me, Dag. I'm your patrol captain. We were worried sick. ( ...with us thinking you finally got yourself killed with no one knowing where the body lies, to boot.)"  ... or words to that effect. The parenthetical would be gleaned from Mari and the patrols' actions and by play.  3) Dag's and Mari's confrontation in the stable when Mari warns Dag not to have an affair with Fawn followed by her not pinning his ears back the morning after the bow down. 

If Mari is mean enough to have a dawn muster after a bow down (as she apparently did in the past), she's mean enough to pull him aside and ream him out for his behavior. All she did was shake her head at him. I think Mari was subconsciously relieved at seeing Dag doing something stupid that was life-related and not death-related. At first glance and second glance, Dag looked infatuated. 

As for Ma Redwing Hickory [1]... I'm waiting to see if she will go ballistic: "I've been pushing you at every eligible female of breeding age, and you take up with that... that... Thing! [2]" or be freezingly polite: "Well. This is unexpected." 

Victoria

[1] The blurb on the HarperCollins.com web site doesn't mention Dag's last names, (family, camp, etc.) Was that deliberate? 

[2] For the uninitiated in Midwestern Polite Language, calling someone's date/spouse "So-and-So's Thing" is the ultimate insult. 


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-- Scott Raun



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