[LMB] SP: TSK:B Chapter 13

Beth Mitcham mitcham.beth at gmail.com
Tue Dec 12 06:52:14 GMT 2006


On 12/11/06, Victoria L'Ecuyer <vlecuyer at ksu.edu> wrote:
> Chapter 13
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> First off, why is Fawn so attuned to Dag's needs?

What do you mean here? I didn't notice anything special, beyond what
what you'd generally figure on doing for a companion with two bad
hands.

> Secondly, why do
> neither one use the words "I love you" or variations thereof in their
> declaration of being together forever? This is a romance after all.

Uh, because it would be wildly out of character?  It's a romance, but
not in the sense that Lois expects it to be shelved a few inches away
from Jo Beverley.  It's not trying to hit the buzzwords and tropes of
a book sold in the romance section of the library; it's a book (OK,
half a book) trying to keep the relationship between two characters at
the center of the story.

I haven't seen anything in Lakewalker culture that makes me think that
they have a huge thing built around "those three little words."  I
don't think Dag and Fawn think of themselves as being in love -- they
think they want to spend their lives together, that they bring
pleasure to each other, that they make each other stronger than they
are separately.

I'm actually very happy about this; it bugs me when I read romances,
especially non-contemporary ones, and there is some scene where one
character throws a tantrum about not hearing the words "I love you"
when the other character has just spent hundreds of pages proving love
with every action chosen.  Hey, words are cheap.

> I'm assuming that
> Fawn has given up on being loved and Dag just doesn't think of it
> because of his late wife. I'd say they're both living in the past, still
> and not really planning for the future. Shoot, they're barely in the
> present.

Dag has been living in the present for the past seventeen years and
has only begun to contemplate a future for the past week or so.  He's
been ignoring his past for about that long.  Fawn completely redrew
her future when she found out she was pregnant, when she discovered
Sunny's miserable true self, when she lost the baby, when she found
that Dag wasn't indulging in a summer fling but was serious about
staying with her.  She doesn't really have a past, just a childhood.

I don't think they are living in the past, but I think neither of them
is up for real long-term thinking yet.  I also think that until they
meet Dag's family they can't really know what their long-term plans
are.

> Last, but not least.... I think Fawn is to blame for the way she gets
> treated. The inconsiderate rudenss runs both ways. She should have told
> Nattie that she was leaving even if she told no one else.

I think Fawn is definitely part of the family and has responsibility
for contributing to the family dynamics.  I do cut her slack for not
telling Nattie -- she was eighteen and dealing with a huge and
terrifying problem.  Telling Nattie would have been emotionally very
costly, and she might not have had the courage for both talking and
leaving.  It was damaging to Nattie, but sometimes you have to take
care of yourself first.

Thanks for another chapter discussion!

Beth Mitcham
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