[LMB] SP: TSK:B Chapter 13

Sylvus Tarn sylvus at rejiquar.com
Wed Dec 13 02:02:43 GMT 2006


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On Mon, 2006-12-11 at 11:13 -0600, Victoria L'Ecuyer wrote:
> First off, why is Fawn so attuned to Dag's needs? Secondly, why do 
> neither one use the words "I love you" or variations thereof in their
> declaration of being together forever? This is a romance after all. 
> Those are the three BIG words every romance must have. 

Baloney.

That's like saying the main characters must meet in the very first
chapter, and fall in love in the first 20 pages.

People who have been hurt in love might have excellent reasons to wait
before jumping the `i lo-o-o-ve you' gun.  That doesn't mean they're not
crazy about each other.

> 'm assuming that Fawn has given up on being loved and Dag just doesn't
> think of it because of his late wife. I'd say they're both living in
> the past, still and not really planning for the future. Shoot, they're
> barely in the present.
> 
Well.  Gee.  Um.  One of those `are we reading the same book'? moments,
I guess.  Please to note that some folks, even deeply in love, are not
particularly demonstrative (though I wouldn't say fawn and dag fall into
that category).  One of the things I liked about these characters was
that they pretty much like and respected each other from the get-go,
whereas the scenario you describe is awfully bleak, and not very
respectful.  Fawn may be young, inexperienced, and had rotten luck with
Sunny, but she still thinks well enough of herself that while she might
not be looking for love, she's hardly given up on it---if nothing else,
witness her determination to care for and love her baby.

Dag, for all his [possibly] suicidal tendancies still cares enough to
risk his life for his partner, and protect young patrollers.  He cares
enough about Fawn, even when he doesn't know her well, to be appalled at
her proximity to a malice, given her pregnancy.  Thus, these people may
not be `ripe for love' (though circumstances prove different) but they
still show a capacity for love.

> Next, Nattie is pretty much wall paper among the Bluefields. The fact
> that she has groundsense makes her of some brief interest to Dag. The
> rest of the family pretty much smothers that interest. Based on
> Nattie's curiosity about Dag plus her wait and see attitude, I'd say
> Nattie is one to let people be themselves. Maybe that's why she's the
> wallpaper of the family.

Nattie is a somewhat curious character to me because her power within
family dynamics is so variable.  On the one hand, she doesn't do much to
stop or even slow Fawn's brothers' attacks on Fawn; on the other, she
has the wherewithal to adjudicate major family (even tribal) disputes,
as with the feud she averts over the twins' ill-advised cow adventure,
and the fact that it is ultimately her decision that Dag will become
part of the bluefield family.  

That she suddenly had the authority to make that judgement stick was one
of the only two facets of the book I didn't find believable.  (I'm still
researching the other one and it's only a technical point anyway.)

> 
> Last, but not least.... I think Fawn is to blame for the way she gets
> treated. The inconsiderate rudenss runs both ways. She should have
> told Nattie that she was leaving even if she told no one else.

But Fawn refuses to tell Nattie anything about her problems with Sunny,
of which her decision to leave is a part.  So that made sense.  If she'd
told Nattie about Sunny, then Nattie probably would've talked her out of
leaving, and poof, no plot.  

I grant you Fawn's parents also wavered a bit from being perfectly
sensible (as when Fawn's father joins forces, and mirrors Dag's
patrolleresque brusqueness in the barn with the twin that tried to pack
dag's stuff up during the attempt to run him out of town) but for the
most part the entire family has little use for Fawn, aside from the
labor she provides.  One begins to suspect that a big part of Fawn's
problem is that she's a guurrrrl, and lives in a very patriarchal
society.  Thus, Fawn's father takes her part (or rather Dag's) because
Dag is a man and they look up to him.


> Nattie may not stand up for her, but she's done no harm to her either.
> Due to Fawn's lack of painful memories where Nattie is concerned, one
> would think Fawn would have the basic decency to not let Nattie worry.

Not once Fawn made the decision to keep Sunny secret.  And considering
how shamed she is by his name-calling, that made sense.

sylvus tarn
http://rejiquar.com


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