[LMB] SP: TSK:B Chapter 18

tonyzbaraschuk at netzero.net tonyzbaraschuk at netzero.net
Fri Dec 15 23:52:32 GMT 2006


Scott Raun wrote:
>On Thu, Dec 14, 2006 at 09:24:50AM -0600, Victoria L'Ecuyer wrote:
>> Chapter 18
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>> Are there no physical battles on open ground? I don't count Fawn being 
>> abducted in Chapter 2. She was carried into woods for the assault. Is 
>> this a metaphor or just something to do with how thick the trees grow? I 
>> see the landscape as mostly open with woods in the hard-to-farm or build 
>> places. Could the landscape really be mostly woods with open spaces in 
>> the easy-to-farm-and-build areas? All this fighting and danger in the 
>> woods is starting to make me feel claustrophobic.
>
>The landscape is mostly wooded - actually, given the time frames
>discussed, it's probably climax forest.  So, yes - it's mostly woods
>with open spaces where the farmers have cleared land.
 
Right.  Having dwelt in the area for a while during graduate school, it's 
very forested except where the trees have actually been cut down.  Lots of trees,
lots of large trees, lots of heavy trees.  And speaking as a historian, a lot of that area 
is going to be swampy as well, without drainage canals.  (George Rogers Clark and
his expedition, for instance, spent a week or so wading through bogs and flooded
forests, in their expedition to the Ohio forts in the Revolutionary War.)  
 
We don't see a lot of there here, barring the one scene where Dag leads a patrol and
we get about a paragraph description of bogs, but then most of the book is set 
around farmers' areas, and they won't be developing and draining bogs until after they've 
settled the non-boggy land.  I wonder if something keeps the malices from growing if 
they're exposed to too much water early on -- considering what they can do to wolves,
having them do the same thing to cottonmouths would be Very Scary.
 
Then again, the only one we've seen was described as a somewhat animate lump of
earth hiding in a cave.  Possibly they really can be dissolved by rain or something.
Plot-wise, having the forest represent the really tangled areas of Fawn's life makes
some sense.  It also puts a new meaning into Dag climbing the tree (he's getting
_really_ involved with Fawn's difficulties, on a thematic as well as a practical level.)
(Am I on the right track, Your Ladyship?)


Tony Zbaraschuk

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