[LMB] Cetaganda: origin of haut

Tel teluekh at yahoo.com
Thu Jun 3 04:44:41 BST 2010



--- On Wed, 6/2/10, M. Haller Yamada <thefabmadamem at yahoo.com> wrote:

> From: M. Haller Yamada <thefabmadamem at yahoo.com>
> Subject: [LMB]  Cetaganda: origin of haut
> To: lois-bujold at lists.herald.co.uk
> Date: Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 8:26 PM
> (-: I'm trying to find ways for it to
> be perfectly justifiable to have Cetaganda have a huge
> population bursts, while Barrayar doesn't. Tel, I think you
> discount the arable land problem too much. Barrayar had
> constant warfare, limited land, and for some reason, they
> thought warring was more important than growing the
> population. 

Yeah, but primitive places with constant warfare and arable land shortages -still- grow faster than modernized Iowas. Barrayaran-style terraforming and farming gave lots of rural unskilled labor the means of making a living and starting a family. Modern mechanized farms instead displace fertile rural populations to population sink cities :)

Anyway, they don't need nearly as much arable land because nothing's eating their crops except them. They don't have mice, locusts, most crop diseases, earth weeds, and so on... (they might have some of those by present day, but they wouldn't have been on the first ship that got stranded)

> 
> I think Cetaganda Prime must also have had a lot of
> warfare. But perhaps (and I admit, there is no textev),
> Cetaganda had unlimited arable land, perhaps uterine
> replicators as soon as they were available, and more medical
> technology. IF children were looked upon as prize resources
> for the war effort (not just cannon fodder, although there
> was that, but also workers for the war effort), and IF the
> children were all creched out (raised away from their
> biological families to serve the state), perhaps there might
> be a large population expansion. 

Being an immigration magnet in the past or conquering an immigration magnet are really the only plausible possibilities, IMHO.


      



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