[LMB] monarchy on Barrayar

Laura Gallagher celticdragonfly at gmail.com
Mon Nov 8 16:35:28 GMT 2010


>> and a deformity or mutilating injury could
>> disqualify an heir.
>
> I'm intrigued.  When and where?

Early Irish law disqualified individuals for kingship if they were blemished.

I found one mention that the legal tract Bechbretha relates the story
of Congal Cáech who was deposed on account of being blinded by a bee.

Here's another example  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suremphaa
"Suremphaa (reign 1751-1769) or Rajeswar Singha, the fourth son of
Rudra Singha, became the king of the Ahom kingdom after the death of
his brother King Pramatta Singha. Rudra Singha's third son, Mohanmala
Gohain, was considered ineligible for kingship as his face was pitted
with smallpox marks. According to the norm established after Sulikphaa
Lora Roja, an Ahom prince had to be free from any physical disability,
defects or deformities to become a king."

I know there are others, that's what I could pull up quickly.  It ties
back to kingship being religiously related - the king seen as
something of a priest or potential sacrifice, that must be
unblemished.

Laura Gallagher



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