[LMB] Vorkosiverse language

Patricia Brimhall pbrimhall at tx.rr.com
Mon Jan 10 14:00:54 GMT 2011


A couple from my Grandmother (dirt-poor backwoods Texas):

"Want in one hand and spit in the other, see which one fills up first."  (As
a reply to "I want ...", what kids wanted wasn't a big priority in her
world.)

"He's so sweet on himself, you'd think he didn't have to lime the outhouse
when he goes." (They kept a bag of lime in the outhouse and after you did
your business, you'd dump a scoop of lime in to keep dpwn the smell.)

-----Original Message-----
From: lois-bujold-bounces at lists.herald.co.uk
[mailto:lois-bujold-bounces at lists.herald.co.uk] On Behalf Of Gwynne Powell
Sent: Monday, January 10, 2011 7:27 AM
To: lois-bujold at lists.herald.co.uk
Subject: Re: [LMB] Vorkosiverse language


> From: queenortart <queenortart at gmail.com>
> To: "Discussion of the works of Lois McMaster Bujold."

> Our version growing up in Lancashire was "Put wood in t'hole"
> 
> The other two I remember being said all the time when I was little 
> were "Thays a better door than a winda" if you were stood in the way 
> of something and "Well... I'll go to foot of our stairs" I have no 
> idea why people said this.
> 
> Sue

A popular one in my family was, "You're a pane, but you're not glass." for
anyone who was blocking the view.
 
For hunger: "I could eat a horse and chase the jockey."
 
My grandmother would "put the 'fluence" on people to influence them to do
something.
 
"What's yours is mine and what's mine's my own."
 
"He couldn't run a chook raffle if you gave him the chooks."

"He couldn't lie straight in bed."
 
"I'm busy as a dog in a paddock of rabbits."
 
"He'd lie like a pig in mud."
 
Ahhh the memories.
 
Gwynne 		 	   		  
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