[LMB] Effects of "Global Warming"

JenL jenl1625 at gmail.com
Tue Sep 13 02:12:22 BST 2011


On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 7:42 PM, Jeff Shultz <jeffshultz at gmail.com> wrote:

> On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 4:20 PM, JenL <jenl1625 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > On Mon, Sep 12, 2011 at 7:06 PM, Jeff Shultz <jeffshultz at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >
> > > What I like about this is how some archeologists are having fun in
> > > Greenland
> > > going over villages that are now appearing where the ice is retreating.
> > >
> > > Interestingly enough, they aren't finding evidence that the native
> people
> > > then had SUV's and corporate jets... but they did apparently have
> > > significantly higher temps, as evidenced by the fact that there wasn't
> > any
> > > ice there when they set up a village.
> > >
> > >
> > Okay, let's oversimplify and say there are two causes of the current
> global
> > climate change - human activity and ... the sun entering a warmer phase.
> >  Let's say, just for argument, that there's simply no way to know how
> much
> > of that climate change is a result of human action.  Let's say we can't
> > know
> > *exactly* how much damage the climate change will cause, but we know it
> > will
> > cause damage.  Sea levels rise, which means the water is higher to start
> > with when a storm pushes that storm surge higher, or a tidal wave hits.
> >  Storms become more frequent, stronger, etc.
> >
> > Big oversimplification - you just assumed that human activity plays any
> measurable part. This has not been proven.  At least not to my
> satisfaction.
>
>
>
> > In that scenario, having no idea how much of the cause is human -
> Shouldn't
> > we still be trying to prevent the damage?  Even if the cause is the sun,
> > which we can't affect, shouldn't we be trying to find *anything* we can
> to
> > reduce the damage we do, maybe find ways to counter the effect the sun is
> > having?
> >
> > But the only *anything* seems to involve trashing the economies of the
> developed world to try and fix a problem with solutions that are not proven
> to be causing the problem. The one thing I have seen that I sort of trust
> is
> those who are saying that if it's human caused, nothing we can do can fix
> it
> at this point.
>
>
> > Because the idea that as long as it wasn't human-caused, it's okay that
> > coastal cities get hit with more frequent hurricanes, that some of them
> > flood out, that our global climate becomes less predictable, that our
> > fertile areas dry out or get swamped ...  Not an idea I'd sign to.  And
> no,
> > I don't drive a Prius.  But I deeply wish folks would stop arguing over
> > whether it's human-caused and start talking about what can really be done
> > about it, at what cost, at what risk, with what likely effects...
> >
> > You're still trying to fix a problem that you don't even know if you've
> caused - or are quite sure how.
>

Does it MATTER whether I caused the problem?  Seems to me the only
meaningful questions are "is this a problem" and "can we fix it".
The answer to the second one is still out.  But it seems pretty clear
there's a problem.

jen

>
>

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