[LMB] Games & Sports

Howard Brazee howard at brazee.net
Thu Sep 5 13:21:49 BST 2013


On Sep 4, 2013, at 11:12 AM, Peter Granzeau <pgranzeau at cox.net> wrote:

>>> What about non-team sports such as golf?
>> 
>>> ?
>>> *laughs*
>>> ?
>>> I doubt I will *ever* understand golf.
>>> ?
>> 
>> It is reported that an 1892 article in Punch was the first to describe golf as "Hit a Very Small Ball into an Even Smaller Hole, with Weapons Singularly Ill-Designed for the Purpose."
> 
> Ha!  An interesting take on what has also been called "A good walk, spoiled."
> 
> Golf can be a team sport--usually a set number of matches between members of two teams.   The Ryder Cup is a set of matches between two teams (from the US and Europe), played in various ways--scotch doubles, best ball foursomes, and individual matches. There is no "medal" scoring, I believe (e.g, all are played to win the most holes, not to score lowest on 18 holes)

I went to a Solheim Cup practice round last month with my granddaughters.

I was thinking how one can think golf doesn't make sense - while playing Solitaire.    Certainly standard Solitaire makes less sense.    And most computer games.

The "most" in that line brought me back on-topic.

We see one on-topic computer game, which isn't used as a time killer the way most all of ours are used.   Thinking on it, it also is an example of computers more advanced than a typical phone of today.  (Are there other examples?   I expect the Haut used more advanced computers - but far future SF is very rarely about extrapolation that far, it's about our issues *now*).   

The point is that that simulation wasn't created primarily for fun - but as a teaching aid.   We see mention of sports that are useful for combat as well.


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