[LMB] OT: das vs. der, was Origins of Cetaganda

Marc Wilson marc.wilson at gmx.co.uk
Thu Oct 29 15:31:23 GMT 2015


On Wed, 28 Oct 2015 17:27:11 -0400, Fred Smith
<fredex at fcshome.stoneham.ma.us> wrote:

>On Wed, Oct 28, 2015 at 05:20:42PM -0400, Sylvia McIvers wrote:
>> On Wed, Oct 28, 2015 at 12:04 PM, markus baur <baur at chello.at> wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> > markus baur                     SCA: markus von brixlegg
>> > s
>> > "der Markus?? .... das ist der mit dem Buch..."
>> >
>> > --
>> >
>> 
>> So here's a question. If 'das' and 'der' both mean 'the' then why are both
>> used in the .sig?
>> 
>> Sylvia, grammar geek
>
>my German is very weak (very), but I'd surmise that das has connotations
>of "this one" (or at least some specific one) while der may not.
>

In this context, "das" is "that".

"Markus? that's him with the book."

Der, die, and das can all mean "the", as German is a gendered language
which includes a neuter gender.

Prepending "der" to a name is kind of slangy: it implies a particular
instance of $name, the one we both know.

There's an interesting parallel to this in Liverpool dialect (aka
"Scouse"), where you might refer to someone both parties know well as
"Our $name") - mainly used within families, but extensible to close
friendship groups.  


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