[LMB] late-series copy-editing/copyediting/copy editing

Paula Lieberman paal at filker.org
Fri Sep 18 23:32:58 BST 2015


Mathematics deals with it with discontinuities, infinitesmals and doing 
thing like 0+ and 0-, which 0- is infinitesmally less than 0, and 0+ is 
infinitesmally greater than 0.

What mattersi are the conventions being -consistent-....

There are reasons for things like clock synchronization!

"Timing and synchronization are always problems"

I don't think it got addressed much in Lois' work, it did in e.g A Tale of 
Two Clocks by James Schmitz, in Fire Lord by Cheryl Franklin, in was it Time 
for the Sars, byHeinlein, etc.

--Paula Lieberman
-----Original Message----- 
From: Marc Wilson
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2015 01:03 PM
To: LMB
Subject: Re: [LMB] late-series copy-editing/copyediting/copy editing

On Fri, 18 Sep 2015 10:15:57 -0600, Howard Brazee <howard at brazee.net>
wrote:

>
>> On Sep 18, 2015, at 9:55 AM, Marc Wilson <marc.wilson at gmx.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> The other ambiguity that is being illogically resolved is accepting 
>>> 12:00 AM and 12:00 PM.   Those shouldn’t exist!
>>
>> 12 AM is midnight, 12 PM is midday.  I don't see the problem (though I'm
>> more in favour of 24-hour clocks for any important use).
>
>12 M is noon , 12 MM is midnight.   M stands for meridian.
>
>But why are we using latin anyway?
>
>>
>> Based on the fact that 12:00:01 AM is definitely in the morning, so
>> 12:00:00 is held to be the dividing line, and the same for PM.
>>
>> You could argue the other way, of course, but it's the convention.
>
>11:59 PM is definitely in the evening, so 12:00:00 is the dividing line, 
>being neither morning nor evening.   You can argue the other way, but it is 
>illogical.
>
>I avoid ambiguity by never assuming someone else has the same understanding 
>of which date midnight is on, nor whether noon is before noon or after 
>noon.
>
>Hey, lets meet at noon afternoon today, and maybe noon before noon 
>tomorrow?

You are tilting at toy windmills.  Clock time is an arbitrary thing
anyway, we have certain conventions and they work.  It doesn't *matter*
if they're not completely rational.



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