[LMB] A non-list perspective

Corrina Lawson corrinaannelawson at gmail.com
Wed Feb 24 15:51:59 GMT 2016


I have heard grumbling on Tumblr about how all the bisexuals in the
Vorkosigan verse end up in straight (so-called?) relationships rather than
male/male or female/female, or whatnot. (Though I even disagree on that
one, as it seems clear to me that Kareen and Mark have what we'd call an
"open" relationship where sexual exploration also takes place outside their
personal pairing, or so it seems heavily implied.)

And the line "was bisexual" seems to have disturbed some bisexuals I know,
as monogamy does not equal "not bisexual." I understand my friend's point
but one has to take into account the context of that statement in
"Barrayar." The exchange was begun as a political attack on Aral, which
Cordelia deflected initially, the attack took a deeper cut, and that's when
Cordelia defended her husband as monogamous, turning back the slander that
he's busy being unfaithful and sleeping with men, as anything but that
defense would cause Aral political damage that he cannot afford.

But I do see how someone bisexual would flinch at it, given one of our
world's slurs on bisexuality is that they can't be monogamous.

I have seen other complaints about Dono but I can't follow those as they
seem rooted in trying to make Dono's situation reflective of our world,
rather than the fictional world in which he lives, where our
perceptions/rules don't apply.

Corrina

On Tue, Feb 23, 2016 at 9:36 PM, Damien Sullivan <phoenix at mindstalk.net>
wrote:

> On Sun, Feb 21, 2016 at 11:08:46AM -0600, Lois McMaster Bujold wrote:
>
> > sexual-political spectrum seem to object to bisexuals in their
> > fiction, one for being too gay, and the other for being not gay
> > enough.
>
> Ooh, I'll have to go look, I've heard of "not gay enough" but rarely
> seen it, outside of slash vs. het shipping wars in fanfic, which IME
> isn't the same.
>
> In responding to Reddit comments, I realize in passing that, well, the
> series is often called "MilSF, maybe?", but really, if we were to
> quickly describe the climax of most of the books, it'd be more like pulp
> adventure or spy novels than anything military.  It's usually two or
> three people struggling alone in a room, often not even in the military.
> The stories turn on individual action, not fleet movements.
>
> -xx- Damien X-)
> --
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