[LMB] Inventions OT: was Uterine replicator

Jonathan Spencer jonrspence at aol.com
Thu Apr 27 00:38:20 BST 2017


Actually  radio-telephony dates back to the early 1900, and the earliest depictions of what we consider a mobile phone that can fit in a pocket can be found in various magazines including an issue of Punch from 1907  and the following carton which dates from 1925  https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Simplicissimus_Karl_Arnold_Mobile_Telephony.jpg <https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Simplicissimus_Karl_Arnold_Mobile_Telephony.jpg>. Robert Heinlein was rather late to the party in Space Cadet (1948) which was actually two years after Dick Tracey and his famous watchphone (I love the fact that when the Apple watch is teathered to an iPhone, you can actually use the watch as a microphone and speaker!   Then there is one of mystery favorite depiction of a mobile phone: the shoe phone in Get Smart. — totally impracticable.


Jonathan




Jonathan Spencer
jonrspence at aol.com



> On Apr 26, 2017, at 6:59 PM, lois-bujold-request at lists.herald.co.uk wrote:
> 
> On Wed, 26 Apr 2017, at 04:07, Pat Mathews wrote:
> 
>> Or Robert Heinlein and the cell phone.
> 
> No in fact. 
> 
> I worked out that the confusion arises from Americans using 'cellphone'
> to mean (British) 'mobile phone' (German) ) 'Handy' with a extension back to cover all radiophones ever.
> 
> Space Cadet was 1950 and Bell were selling radiophones in US cities the year before. But they were not technically cellphones since they used just one base station with no handover at a boundary.
> 
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone#History <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone#History>
> 
> The advances in mobile telephony have been traced in successive "generations", starting with the early zeroth-generation (0G) services, such as Bell System's Mobile Telephone Service and its successor, the Improved Mobile Telephone Service. These 0G systems were not cellular, supported few simultaneous calls, and were very expensive.
> The Motorola DynaTAC 8000X. First commercially available handheld cellular mobile phone, 1984.
> 
> The first handheld mobile phone was demonstrated by John F.
> Mitchell[1][2] and Martin Cooper of Motorola in 1973, using a handset weighing c. 4.4 lbs (2 kg).[3] The first commercial automated cellular network was launched in Japan by Nippon Telegraph and Telephone in 1979. 
> ==
> 
> RAH invented the waterbed perhaps, but not the cellular networking idea.
> 
> 
> --
>  M R Dolbear
>  little.egret at dolbear.fastmail.fm <mailto:little.egret at dolbear.fastmail.fm>
> --



More information about the Lois-Bujold mailing list