[LMB] Lois-Bujold Digest, Vol 171, Issue 35

Kevin Kennedy kevink45 at hotmail.com
Thu Aug 8 19:17:33 BST 2019


The Indiana State Fair (running now) has a similar contest, Sheep to Shawl. A team of 4 has a loom. already strung, and x amount of clean raw wool. They card the wool, spin it, and weave a shawl. There are usually 4-5 teams competing. They start at 8am and the first shawl might finish around 1. They're then auctioned off for a fundraiser.




________________________________
From: lois-bujold-bounces at lists.herald.co.uk <lois-bujold-bounces at lists.herald.co.uk> on behalf of Jason Long <sturmvogel66 at gmail.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2019 12:05 PM
To: Discussion of the works of Lois McMaster Bujold. <lois-bujold at lists.herald.co.uk>
Subject: Re: [LMB] Lois-Bujold Digest, Vol 171, Issue 35

Thanks for taking the time to look up the links for me.

On Thu, Aug 8, 2019 at 11:22 AM Lorelei Kaena <lorelei.kaena at gmail.com>
wrote:

> Keep in mind I do this as a hobby. The New York Sheep & Wool has a ‘Fleece
> to Sweater’ (knitting, not weaving, which is really the topic here) in a
> few hours. But that’s still 1lb of raw wool to be combed or carded
> (depending on breed) after its been skirted (all the dirtiest stuff
> carefully picked or cut out, we’ll leave the washing out, they’d have
> wanted the lanolin).
> https://youtu.be/3U3fWNJLVyw
[https://i.ytimg.com/vi/3U3fWNJLVyw/hqdefault.jpg]<https://youtu.be/3U3fWNJLVyw>
Ask The Woolery: Carding and Combing<https://youtu.be/3U3fWNJLVyw>
youtu.be
In this "Ask the Woolery" series we explore the differences between carding and combing fibers for hand spinning.


>
> Then you drop or wheel spin the fiber. For weaving, you need it plied and
> pretty fine (look at your clothes, at each thread—they’re made up of
> several ‘plies’). (Vid shows plying first, then some awesome spinning with
> manual color changes. Imagine when this was all done with spindles.)
> https://youtu.be/B0bM8Qn7WJE
>
> So then you transfer to holding bobbins until you have enough to warp
> whatever loom you’ve managed to build (or tablet weave), pray you got the
> weights and yarn right, and (I’ve done this but not anymore, I have EDS and
> it’s hell on the shoulders):
> https://youtu.be/rOJcdmBhjBE
>
>
>
>
> Turlach
>
>
>
> > On 8 Aug 2019, at 10:49, Jason Long <sturmvogel66 at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > How cool! What would be your estimate of the time required to make a
> shirt
> > or dress from start to finish? And do you find it more efficient to
> > organize your workflow in stages (all the fiber processing in one stage,
> > spinning thread in another, etc.) or to do it more-or-less in one
> > continuous process?
> >
> > On Thu, Aug 8, 2019 at 9:04 AM Lorelei Kaena <lorelei.kaena at gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> And the biggest, *make cloth*. I actually do it from raw fiber, to save
> >> money and occupy time, and for any amount you’re going to weave you’re
> >> going to need everyone you can get to be a decent spinner.
> >>
> >> You scrape skins with the knapped rocks, by the way, then soak them in
> >> vats of urine. Much better than chewing (but gets the enzymes).
> >>
> >> Turlach
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>> On 8 Aug 2019, at 07:35, Marc Wilson <marc.wilson at gmx.co.uk> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> On Wed, 7 Aug 2019 09:42:36 -0400, Lorelei Kaena
> >>> <lorelei.kaena at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> Everyone would have been needed to help do anything. Do you know how
> >> much time it takes to make cloth?
> >>>>
> >>>> That’s the answer to some of your questions about children, the
> >> elderly, and disabled. Cloth production from raw fiber is time consuming
> >> but nearly everyone can do each step.
> >>>>
> >>>> Then there’s watching the kids. Why have an able-bodied woman in the
> >> house who can be working a field when a elderly or disabled person or
> >> people can ride herd on the kids? That’s why the living in family
> groups.
> >> It’s simple social dynamics.
> >>>>
> >>>> They’ve found disabled, healed Neanderthals, who had obviously lived
> >> with their conditions but were useless to the group. We aren’t baseline
> >> savages.
> >>>
> >>> Except not "useless", as you detailed in your previous paragraphs. OK,
> >>> they couldn't hunt, and perhaps even gather, but they could chew skins,
> >>> knap flint, watch kids (and pots).
> >>>>
> >>> --
> >>> "The future is here already.  It's just unevenly distributed."  -
> >> William Gibson
> >>> --
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> >>> Lois-Bujold at lists.herald.co.uk
> >>> http://lists.herald.co.uk/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/lois-bujold
> >> --
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> >> Lois-Bujold at lists.herald.co.uk
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> >>
> > --
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