[LMB] The ideal crime

Marc Wilson marc.wilson at gmx.co.uk
Mon Aug 19 02:03:31 BST 2019


On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 16:11:58 -0400, Matthew George <matt.msg at gmail.com>
wrote:

>On Wed, Aug 14, 2019 at 2:04 PM Eric Oppen <ravenclaweric at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Defense of one's own life, or the life of another, is a legal defense for
>> homicide just about everywhere, at least here in the US.
>>
>
>I'm told in Great Britain defense of property isn't adequate, and you have
>to be able to prove that you were not only in reasonable fear for your life
>but that you had no other options.

It's a little more nuanced than that, and has changed in recent years to
tilt more in favour of the householder.

The law requires any response to be "proportionate", so Tony Martin, the
farmer who shot and killed a teenage burglar who was running away, was
rightly imprisoned for manslaughter.  He's out now - oddly enough, he
doesn't get many cold callers.

The law now says you can use "reasonable force", up to and including
lethal force, and in general you won't be prosecuted unless the response
is "grossly disproportionate" (e.g. if you stabbed someone who was
unconscious).  Also, a burglar who is injured in the commission of a
crime cannot sue the householder without permission from the court,
which would only be granted in exceptional circumstances.
>
>Matt "what's great about it?" G.

That old chestnut?

"Great Britain" is the name of the landmass which contains England,
Scotland and Wales.  It's "Great Britain" to distinguish it from "Less
Britain", which is these days known as Brittany (the link is more
obvious in French: Bretagne and Grand Bretagne).  It's not some
Victorian vainglory.

"Great Britain", modulo language, has been called such since Roman
times.

The UK, or to give it its full name "The United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland", is the political entity.

Scotland may leave the UK, but it can never leave Great Britain, without
some startling advances in geoengineering.  Northern Ireland, in
contrast, cannot be part of Great Britain, however fervently they may
wish it (a largely unrequited passion, I might add).
--
The other day, upon the stair,
I saw a man who wasn't there.
He wasn't there again today -
I think he's from the CIA.  -  anon.


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