[LMB] Expressions in fiction

Eric Oppen ravenclaweric at gmail.com
Mon Nov 2 18:17:22 GMT 2020


Many blacks are perfectly well able to speak standard English as well as
what linguists call "Black American English," and switch back and forth
depending on where they are and who they're talking with.  My late father
didn't often DO it, but he could go straight into the sing-song Norwegian
accent you hear on those "Scandihoovian" comedy records he so loved.

On Mon, Nov 2, 2020 at 12:14 PM Marc Wilson <marc.wilson at gmx.co.uk> wrote:

> On Wed, 28 Oct 2020 07:11:32 -0600, Howard Brazee <howard at brazee.net>
> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> >> On Oct 28, 2020, at 12:17 AM, Raymond Collins <rcrcoll6 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Yes, Spanglish comes to mind. But California is also multi ethnic and
> many
> >> linguistic expressions would be adopted.  However that depends on how
> >> isolated California would become. On the other hand a many British TV
> >> watchers can understand the English on BBC and yet among themselves
> they'll
> >> speak a English we barely understand.
> >
> >People can be “multi-lingual” within one language, being competent with
> more than one dialog.
>
> "Code-shifting" is a somewhat live issue here in the UK.
> --
> "Nuclear physics is much easier than tax law. It's rational and always
> works
>  the same way." - Jerold Rochwald
>
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