[LMB] OT: Backups using My Book Live

Eric Oppen ravenclaweric at gmail.com
Sun Jun 27 20:00:42 BST 2021


I read *Lest Darkness Fall* years ago, and love it.

Part of Padway's problem with paper was that he really didn't know how the
stuff was made.  If I had the knowledge (it's not difficult; college art
classes teach it and I've seen it done at SCA events) that would not be an
insurmountable difficulty.  Particularly if, once I really got going, I
made a point of buying up old, worn-out linen cheap for material to work
with.

On Sun, Jun 27, 2021 at 1:54 PM <kbarry at bitsofhistory.com> wrote:

>
>
>
>
>
> Heliographs and a form of Morse were inventions that he did introduce.
> Along with a system of line-of-sight towers along the Limes.
>
>
> On Sun, 27 Jun 2021 19:02:35 +0200 (CEST), baur baur via Lois-Bujold <
> lois-bujold at lists.herald.co.uk> wrote:
>
> i would argue that heliographs and morsecode would be easier and faster to
> introduce (Heliogpraphs are faster in transmission and can bridge longer
> distances without the use of telescopes)
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heliograph
>
> servus
>
> markus
>
>
>
> > Howard Brazee  hat am 27.06.2021 16:48 geschrieben:
> >
> >
> > I remember one technology that he added was semaphore towers.
> >
> > > On Jun 27, 2021, at 7:38 AM, kbarry at bitsofhistory.com wrote:
> > >
> > > Paper making in ancient Rome? In that case I would highly recommend
> "Lest Darkness Fall" by L. Sprague de Camp written in 1939.
> > > Despite being written 80+ years ago, it stands up very well today.
> > >
> > > The hero (an archaeologist by the name of Martin Padway) was
> accidentally transported to ancient Rome circa 535 AD, a time when Rome was
> under great pressure from outside forces and itself ruled by a succession
> of incompetent emperors. With no way back to his home timeline he decides
> that not letting the "Dark Ages" come to pass would be best way to ensure
> his survival. And one of the keys to making that happen would be to
> introduce the printing press to make books so common that knowledge would
> accumulate and not be lost from generation to generation.
> > >
> > > What you may find interesting are the sections where the author
> details Martin's effort to introduce both the printing press and useable,
> mass produced, paper. It could be done, but it may not be as easy as you
> think.
> >
> > --
> > Lois-Bujold mailing list message sent to baur at chello.at
> > Lois-Bujold at lists.herald.co.uk
> > http://lists.herald.co.uk/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/lois-bujold
> --
> Lois-Bujold mailing list message sent to kbarry at bitsofhistory.com
> Lois-Bujold at lists.herald.co.uk
> http://lists.herald.co.uk/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/lois-bujold
>
>
>
>
> --
> Lois-Bujold mailing list message sent to ravenclaweric at gmail.com
> Lois-Bujold at lists.herald.co.uk
> http://lists.herald.co.uk/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/lois-bujold
>


More information about the Lois-Bujold mailing list